Walking Away Equally Unhappy

Event: ProVisors Panel on Negotiation
Venue: Calabasas Country Club
Location: Calabasas, Los Angeles, Ca
Speaker: Attorney Douglas Schreiber of Anker, Hymes & Schreiber, LLP

Transcription:

There is something that I constantly heard over and over again from judges when you would be at a settlement conference. Every judge would give the lecture and I’m sure every lawyer who is in this room has been in front of a judge at some kind of settlement conference has heard it: (more…)

Business Disputes and Succession Planning

Event: ProVisors Panel on Negotiation
Venue: Calabasas Country Club
Location: Calabasas, Los Angeles, Ca
Speaker: Attorney Douglas Schreiber of Anker, Hymes & Schreiber, LLP

Transcription:

I come into the negotiation process typically in a slightly different situation. Mark is looking to build a relationship. By the time I usually get involved, I’m looking to get rid of a relationship, quite honestly:
(more…)

What To Do in a Heated Negotiation

Event: ProVisors Panel on Negotiation
Venue: Calabasas Country Club
Location: Calabasas, Los Angeles, Ca
Speaker: Attorney Douglas Schreiber of Anker, Hymes & Schreiber, LLP

Business Attorney Doug Schreiber of Anker, Hymes and Schreiber, LLP answers the question of what to do when things get heated in a negotiation.

Transcription:

Mediator: What do you do in a contentious situation? This sounds like everybody’s having a great time and you can figure out must haves, and you can walk away. What do you when it’s contentious?

Attorney Doug Schreiber: That happens a lot. You try to backup and find some form of agreement.   If it’s a situation where you are arguing over an amount of money, maybe you back away from the amount and talk potential about terms. (more…)

Be Willing to Walk Away in a Negotiation

Event: ProVisors Panel on Negotiation
Venue: Calabasas Country Club
Location: Calabasas, Los Angeles, Ca
Speaker: Attorney Douglas Schreiber of Anker, Hymes & Schreiber, LLP

Transcription:

Be willing to walk away. That sometimes is the most powerful tool in any negotiation. The ability and willingness to walk away.

Recently my law firm, settled a case where we had been at a mandatory settlement conference in front of a judge. He pounded on us and pounded on us to settle for an amount which was way above our bottom line.

What did we do? (more…)

Knowing Your Bottom Line in a Negotiation

Event: ProVisors Panel on Negotiation
Venue: Calabasas Country Club
Location: Calabasas, Los Angeles, Ca
Speaker: Attorney Douglas Schreiber of Anker, Hymes & Schreiber, LLP

Transcription:

You need to know your bottom line.  Nowadays everybody has their heads full of all kinds of acronyms, so I am going to throw one out there: (more…)

Art of Negotiation: Starting and Pressure Points

Event: ProVisors Panel on Negotiation
Venue: Calabasas Country Club
Location: Calabasas, Los Angeles, Ca
Speaker: Attorney Douglas Schreiber of Anker, Hymes & Schreiber, LLP

Transcription:

Before you go into a negotiation you need to be prepared:

  • What are your needs?
  • What are your wants?
  • What are the other sides weaknesses or pressure points?

I focus a lot on #3.  Here is a great example: (more…)

Is Your Agreement Worth the Paper it is Written On?

California Supreme Court logoThe California Supreme Court recently answered that question with a resounding “No”.  In one of its early decisions in 2013, Riverisland Cold Storage vs. Fresno-Madera Production Credit Association, the Court rejected what had previously been a long standing exception (since 1935) to what is known as the “parol evidence rule”.  In brief, the parol evidence rule restricts one’s ability to present evidence, in certain situations, that would contradict, alter or add to the terms of a written agreement.

The situation involved a couple who feel behind on their loan payments.  They entered into an agreement which involved the lender agreeing not to take any enforcement action provided they continued to make the newly agreed upon payments.  A representative of the lender told the couple, among other things,  they would have a two year extension on the loan.  When the couple was presented with the mountain of paperwork for them to sign which documented the agreement (which they, not uncommonly, did not read), the actual additional term was three months.

Ultimately the couple sued the lender, claiming that they had been defrauded in that they were told something contrary to what was in the agreement they signed.  The Supreme Court, in a break from precedent that had been in effect for more than 75 years, held the couple could proceed with their claim.  The court did note though that the burden of proving the necessary elements of their claim was significant.

If you have a question regarding this decision or a specific agreement, you can contact our Contract Attorney in Woodland Hills at Anker, Hymes & Schreiber, LLP.

Announcing the Change of Firm Name from Anker Reed HSC to Anker, Hymes & Schreiber, LLP

Anker, Hymes & Schreiber, LLP logoLarry S. Hymes and Douglas K. Schreiber are pleased to announce that Anker Reed HSC has become Anker, Hymes & Schreiber, LLP and will continue the Anker Reed HSC tradition of serving your legal needs in the areas of:

The law firm’s headquarters will remain at its current location:

21333 Oxnard Street, First Floor
Woodland Hills, CA 91367
Phone: (818) 501-5800
Fax: (818) 501-4019

7 Benefits of a Life Insurance Trust

  1. Provides immediate cash to pay estate taxes and other expenses after death.
  2. Reduces estate taxes by removing insurance from your estate.
  3. Inexpensive way to pay estate taxes.
  4. Proceeds avoid probate and are free from income and estate taxes.
  5. Gives you maximum control over insurance policy and how proceeds are used.
  6. Can provide income to spouse without insurance proceeds being included in spouse’s estate.
  7. Prevents court from controlling insurance proceeds if beneficiary is incapacitated.

For more information about Life Insurance Trusts, you can contact our Estate Planning Attorney in Woodland Hills, Los Angeles today.

6 Tips on How to Handle the Responsibility and Potential Liability of Being a Trustee (Part 2) by Rob Cohen

Here are the additional tips continued from “BEING A TRUSTEE IS A THANKLESS JOB: Six Tips on How to Handle the Responsibility and Potential Liability (Part 1)” that might help make your trustee-ship progress more smoothly.

4) Examine the inventory. It is not uncommon for people to set up trusts and then do nothing, assuming that since the documents have been signed the trust is effective. This is not accurate; not only must the trust document be executed, but then the assets must be transferred into the trust, (you must “fund the trust”). Failure to fund the trust is especially common with do-it-yourself websites and computer programs; people mistakenly believe that just having a trust is sufficient. Before a trustee can administer the trust, he or she needs to have assets to administer. When examining the assets, here are some action items to consider.

• If the decedent had a safe deposit box, take possession of it and its contents.
• Consult with banking institutions in the area to find all accounts of the deceased.
• Check for cash and other valuables that may be hidden around the home.
• Locate and inventory all real estate deeds, mortgages, leases, and tax information.
• Provide immediate management for rental properties.
• Locate all household and personal effects and other personal property in order to inventory and protect them.
• Collect all life insurance proceeds payable to the estate.
• Find and safeguard all business interests, valuables, personal property, and important papers.

Ultimately, do your best to make sure that the trust’s assets are actually in the trust. If you identify assets that were not transferred to the trust, ascertain whether they should have been.

5) Take emotion out of the equation.In many situations you can be asked to be a trustee for clients, parents, brothers, sisters, and other family members or friends. When the emotional ties are close, you cannot play favorites. As a trustee you have a huge responsibility and significant exposure. Your actions will be scrutinized and challenged by those beneficiaries who feel they were treated unfairly. Your best bet to avoid personal liability is to be unbiased when dealing with trust matters. If you are not sure about your actions and whether they reflect any bias, ask your attorney.

6) Obtain adequate liability and fidelity insurance. No one is immune to lawsuits, and that includes you in your role as a trustee. To protect yourself, obtain errors and omissions insurance, which protects against claims by beneficiaries that you failed to fulfill your fiduciary duty in the management and administration of the trust. Without the protection of errors and omissions insurance, your personal assets could be “exposed” if a disgruntled beneficiary sues you. It is better to have insurance to protect you and your assets.

Being a trustee is not always an appreciated job, but it certainly is a job with tremendous responsibility. Just remember to be mindful of your duties and ask for advice when in doubt. Trusts contain valuable assets, and as dysfunctional families do not get better when someone passes away, trustees easily can become embroiled in nasty litigation. You may not be able to avoid it, but at least you’ll be able to protect yourself.

For more information on trusts, wills, probate, and the role of trustees, contact Rob Cohen at (818) 501-5800 or emal him at rcohen@ahslawyers.com.

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