Estate Planning Attorney KC Marie Knox of Anker Reed HSC to be Adjunct Law Professor

Attorney KC Marie Knox

Los Angeles Attorney KC Marie Knox

Los Angeles Estate Planning Attorney KC Marie Knox of Anker, Reed, Hymes, Schreiber and Cohen, A Law Corporation (Anker Reed HSC) has accepted an offer to be Adjunct Law Professor at Abraham Lincoln University School of Law.

Esteemed attorney KC Marie Knox will be teaching Wills, Trusts and Estates starting this winter quarter.

About Abraham Lincoln University School of Law:

Abraham Lincoln University (ALU) provides law education via online legal programs for those desiring to take the complete program online, but ALU does not stop there in giving students what they need. ALU offers an interactive education for students so that they know where to go to get their questions answered and to discuss classroom topics.

In-classroom interaction occurs on weekday nights and weekend morning classes. Students and faculty communicate through Live Chat Rooms, even during lecture time, allowing a free-flowing discourse. Lectures are recorded and are made available online for students who missed lectures.

Students also can set up their own Live Chat Rooms serving as small study groups. While traditional law schools and law programs in California have not fully embraced the potential for online student study groups, Abraham Lincoln University School of Law has been a pioneer in creating new ways for students to engage and study through our innovative online legal programs. Abraham Lincoln University School of Law will always strive to be at the cutting edge.

Follow the link to learn more about KC Marie Knox, Estate Planning Attorney in Woodland Hills, Los Angeles, Ca.

6 Tips on How to Handle the Responsibility and Potential Liability of Being a Trustee (Part 2) by Rob Cohen

Here are the additional tips continued from “BEING A TRUSTEE IS A THANKLESS JOB: Six Tips on How to Handle the Responsibility and Potential Liability (Part 1)” that might help make your trustee-ship progress more smoothly.

4) Examine the inventory. It is not uncommon for people to set up trusts and then do nothing, assuming that since the documents have been signed the trust is effective. This is not accurate; not only must the trust document be executed, but then the assets must be transferred into the trust, (you must “fund the trust”). Failure to fund the trust is especially common with do-it-yourself websites and computer programs; people mistakenly believe that just having a trust is sufficient. Before a trustee can administer the trust, he or she needs to have assets to administer. When examining the assets, here are some action items to consider.

• If the decedent had a safe deposit box, take possession of it and its contents.
• Consult with banking institutions in the area to find all accounts of the deceased.
• Check for cash and other valuables that may be hidden around the home.
• Locate and inventory all real estate deeds, mortgages, leases, and tax information.
• Provide immediate management for rental properties.
• Locate all household and personal effects and other personal property in order to inventory and protect them.
• Collect all life insurance proceeds payable to the estate.
• Find and safeguard all business interests, valuables, personal property, and important papers.

Ultimately, do your best to make sure that the trust’s assets are actually in the trust. If you identify assets that were not transferred to the trust, ascertain whether they should have been.

5) Take emotion out of the equation.In many situations you can be asked to be a trustee for clients, parents, brothers, sisters, and other family members or friends. When the emotional ties are close, you cannot play favorites. As a trustee you have a huge responsibility and significant exposure. Your actions will be scrutinized and challenged by those beneficiaries who feel they were treated unfairly. Your best bet to avoid personal liability is to be unbiased when dealing with trust matters. If you are not sure about your actions and whether they reflect any bias, ask your attorney.

6) Obtain adequate liability and fidelity insurance. No one is immune to lawsuits, and that includes you in your role as a trustee. To protect yourself, obtain errors and omissions insurance, which protects against claims by beneficiaries that you failed to fulfill your fiduciary duty in the management and administration of the trust. Without the protection of errors and omissions insurance, your personal assets could be “exposed” if a disgruntled beneficiary sues you. It is better to have insurance to protect you and your assets.

Being a trustee is not always an appreciated job, but it certainly is a job with tremendous responsibility. Just remember to be mindful of your duties and ask for advice when in doubt. Trusts contain valuable assets, and as dysfunctional families do not get better when someone passes away, trustees easily can become embroiled in nasty litigation. You may not be able to avoid it, but at least you’ll be able to protect yourself.

For more information on trusts, wills, probate, and the role of trustees, contact Rob Cohen at (818) 501-5800 or emal him at rcohen@ahslawyers.com.

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What if the Mobilehome Owner Dies Without a Will and No one Comes Forward on Behalf of the Deceased Homeowner?

If the homeowner dies without a will, then as the community owner, the situation is not any different than that described above. You might be presented with a “Small Estates Affidavit”. In the absence of that, a representative of the estate still needs to be appointed. The process is essentially the same as that described above in that a petition is filed with the court by the person who seeks appointment as the legal representative. And if that person is approved by the court, he or she will be issued “Letters of Administration” as discussed previously.

In the situation where you have actual knowledge that the resident has died, but no one has come forward on that person’s behalf, then complicated issues of the proper service of notices necessary under the MRL arise. The proper steps or action to take in such situation will depend on the particular factual circumstances involved. As a result, it is recommended that you specifically consult with your legal counsel about the proper course of conduct in this situation, so you as the owner, can protect yourself from potential liability.

The death of a resident can present many potential “traps” for the mobilehome community owner or manager and it is recommended that you consult with legal counsel to determine the proper steps to take so you can avoid unnecessary liability.

After all, particularly when it comes to legal expense, “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure”.

This Mobilehome Blog Series was co-written by Los Angeles Attorney Doug Schreiber and San Diego Attorney Tamara Cross

To go back to the beginning of the blog series…
Death of a Resident in Your Mobilehome Community: What You Need to Know

For more information on mobilehome community law, please contact our Mobilehome Park Attorney in Los Angeles today.

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